Google Reader

Google announced late last night that it would be closing down eight of it’s services, including popular news aggregator, Google Reader.

Google Reader allows users to collect and organise their favourite articles and blogs, making it quick and simple to get the information that’s relevant to the individual. The rise of social services such as Twitter however, has seen a decline in usage of RSS feeds, and a move towards simpler methods of receiving news.

The Death Of RSS?

As the most popular reader on the web, the loss of Google Reader may lead to the death of the RSS feed altogether. Drew Olanoff writing for TechCrunch claims that the RSS feed never really resonated with “normal folks” (by that I think we’re to assume he means the average internet user). The process of actually explaining it to a non-user proves difficult he suggests, which is why a lot of people never bothered with RSS.

Now with even more acute ways of taking in information, tools such as Google Reader are possibly out-dated. He says:

Thanks to Twitter, Flipboard and Facebook, I have more content than I can shake a stick at. I don’t want to read every single thing that WIRED writes, I want to read the things that people I know think are awesome. Google Reader never did that for me, so it must go.

Joining The Petition?

Here the BirchenallHowden office we use Google Reader every single day, so we’ll be sad to see it go. We’re not the only ones apparently, as already http://savegooglereader.org/ has sprung up online, garnering support and gathering signatures for a number of petitions. As I write this, “Google Reader” is trending on twitter with mixed reactions, but with lots of people disappointed and shocked to see it go.

Just underneath Google Reader on the trends list is “Feedly”. Feedly blogged this morning that they expected the closure of Google Reader and have made it easy for Reader users to “seamlessly” transfer across to an identical interface. If you’ll be affected by the closure of Google Reader, it’s worth taking a look at Feedly.

What they're saying:

5
2
3
4

3 Comments